The Social Costs of Violence Against Women and Girls on Survivors, their Families and Communities in Pakistan

Authors

  • Gina Alvarado Merino Landesa, Washington, DC
  • Jennifer Mueller International Center for Research on Women, Washington, DC
  • Lila O’Brien-Milne International Center for Research on Women, Washington, DC
  • Khalida Ghaus Social Policy and Development Center, Karachi
  • Nata Duvvury National University of Ireland, Galway
  • Stacey Scriver National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46521/pjws.026.01.0013

Keywords:

Violence, Violence against Women and Girls, gender, Costing Studies

Abstract

Past research on gender-based violence (GBV) in Pakistan discusses intimate partner violence (IPV) and non-partner sexual violence (NPSV) but lacks a comprehensive analysis of violence against women and girls (VAWG) and its wider costs and impacts. Our study on the social costs of VAWG aims to fill this gap. Through in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) in rural and urban Pakistan, we explore the types of VAWG that manifest in communities and examine the negative impacts these have on survivors, their families and communities. Our findings reveal that, in addition to the mental health impacts of VAWG on survivors (such as anxiety and suicidal ideation exacerbated by stigma and isolation), a number of social and economic impacts are borne by survivors as well as their relatives and communities. Social norms and institutions that condone and reproduce gender inequity contribute to the acceptance and normalization of VAWG. Lack of service provision and shelter for survivors and social stigma around seeking help heightens the impacts faced by survivors, their families and their communities.

Published

2020-05-30

How to Cite

Merino, G. A. ., Mueller, J. ., O’Brien-Milne, L. ., Ghaus, K. ., Duvvury, N. ., & Scriver, S. . (2020). The Social Costs of Violence Against Women and Girls on Survivors, their Families and Communities in Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Women’s Studies: Alam-E-Niswan, 26(1), 1-20. https://doi.org/10.46521/pjws.026.01.0013